Tour Europe’s beautiful cities without leaving home



Slide 1 of 31: While many have had to put their vacations on hold for now, there is no reason why you couldn't tour some of Europe's most charming fall beauty spots virtually. From romantic capitals to historic citadels, we've picked out some of the most beautiful cities for an armchair tour of this splendid part of the world. To get the most out of these images, view them in 'full screen' mode.
Slide 2 of 31: Nicknamed both the City of Love and Light, it's not hard to see why Paris is so enthralling. Packed chock-full of world-class museums, from the Louvre to the Musée d'Orsay, high-end boutiques, exquisite restaurants and everything else in between, it's rightfully regarded as one of Europe's most significant cultural, culinary and fashion capitals. Take a virtual tour around these French museums and more right now.
Slide 3 of 31: The French capital might be famous for sites like the Eiffel Tower and the Arc de Triomphe, but there's a lot more to the city and its distinctive arrondissements (administrative districts). From the ancient, narrow lanes of Marais to the charm of Montmartre's cobbled streets (pictured), Paris has many faces to it that are equally striking in every season.
Slide 4 of 31: Also famous for the abundance of bridges that cross the Seine, the ornate Pont Alexandre III (pictured) in Paris is probably the city’s most elaborately designed bridge. Resplendent with nymphs, winged horses, cherubs and more, it connects the Champs-Élysées area of Paris with Les Invalides (Military Museum) and the area towards the Eiffel Tower.

Slide 5 of 31: Bustling Berlin is pretty cutting edge compared with a lot of other capital cities, thanks to its booming start-up culture and young artists and innovators everywhere you look. The energy is palpable – but of course renewal and reinvention have been born of necessity here. The city's multilayered history is reflected in such landmarks as the East Side Gallery (the remains of the Berlin Wall) as well as Checkpoint Charlie (a historic crossing point between East and West Germany) and the Holocaust Memorial. 
Slide 6 of 31: The German capital's cultural side is best on display on the charming Museum Island (pictured). Referring to the north side of the island, it's a complex of five significant museums (a sixth, the Humboldt Forum, is due to open near the site later this year), including The Altes (Old) and The Neues (New) Museums, Old National Gallery, the Bode Museum and The Pergamon Museum, which contains several restored and significant buildings, like the Ishtar Gate of Babylon.
Slide 7 of 31: You can't, of course, talk about Berlin without mentioning two of the city's most iconic sites – the Brandenburg Gate (pictured) and the Reichstag Building. The historical home of the German Reich, the latter is famous for its modern mirrored dome while the Brandenburg Gate is the usual site of Berlin's New Year celebrations. Today, it's also the symbol of both the tumultuous history of Europe as well as unity and peace across the region.
Slide 8 of 31: With 32 boroughs in the city, each with its own distinctive look and feel, London truly has something for everyone. London's South Bank offers scenic views of the River Thames and the city itself, City is where a mix of historic buildings, like the Bank of England, exist in harmony with towering skyscrapers and Greenwich's historic streets and regal university buildings feel like stepping through a time machine into the past.
Slide 9 of 31: Buckingham Palace, Westminster Abbey, Houses of Parliament, Trafalgar Square (pictured) – these are just some of the most famous and iconic landmarks found in the British capital. There's also a wealth of museums, housing some of the most exquisite collections in the world, from the British Museum and the V&A to Tate Modern and the National Gallery. And while traditional British cuisine is (unfairly) judged abroad, London is home to some of the best restaurants in the world.

Slide 10 of 31: For such a sprawling and populated city, London boasts plenty of green spaces too. From the vast expanse of Richmond Park to the glorious views of Hampstead Heath, central London also has its fair share of gorgeous parks and gardens. St James's Park (pictured) and Green Park, hugging Buckingham Palace from both sides, are home to an impressive amount of wildlife, including London's famous squirrels. Regent's Park has beautifully manicured lawns and a magical rose garden while Hyde Park, largest of the Royal Parks, is a London landmark. Now see 30 of Britain's most historic towns and cities.
Slide 11 of 31: Bisected by the River Danube, Hungary’s picturesque capital is actually two cities. Consisting of Buda and Pest – separated by the 19th-century Chain Bridge (Széchenyi Bridge) – the city is famed for its many thermal baths, gorgeous architecture, splendid vistas over the Danube and, of course, the one-of-a-kind Hungarian Parliament Building.
Slide 12 of 31: One of Budapest's biggest draws is the thermal baths, with many of them more than a century old and almost all exquisitely renovated. Among the most famous are the Gellért Thermal Bath, renowned for its ornate Art Deco interior, and Széchenyi Thermal Bath (pictured) – Europe's largest medicinal bath. The water here is supplied by two thermal springs with the water hovering around the 167ºF (75ºC) mark. The water here is said to be rich in calcium, magnesium and significant amount of fluoride, all said to contribute to better health.
Slide 13 of 31: Other famous attractions include the turreted fortress Fisherman's Bastion (pictured) and Buda Castle, now home to the Hungarian National Gallery and the Budapest History Museum. City Park is another picturesque location in this charming capital. Home to several popular attractions, including the Museum of Fine Arts, the Széchenyi Thermal Bath and Heroes' Square, one of its most beautiful features is the fairy-tale Vajdahunyad Castle, surrounded by a delightful boating lake.
Slide 14 of 31: Copenhagen is a city that oozes cosmopolitan cool. Pioneers of new Nordic cuisine, Copenhagen's restaurants reflect the city perfectly – slightly serious but charming with plenty of modern flavor. There are plenty of unmissable sites here, from the Royal Library – one the largest in the world – to the Little Mermaid Statue and several royal palaces of the Danish monarchy.

Slide 15 of 31: One of Copenhagen's most recognizable places is Nyhavn (pictured), a 17th-century waterfront and canal. Lined by colorful 17th- and 18th-century townhouses, the canal harbors several historic wooden ships that add to the overall charm of the area. Once a gateway to the sea where sailors would come for the last night of fun before setting sail, it's now home to mostly restaurants and boutiques. One of the townhouses (No.67) was were Hans Christian Andersen lived between 1845 and 1864.
Slide 16 of 31: Among Copenhagen's most exciting draws is Tivoli Gardens (pictured). This elaborate amusement park in Copenhagen has been entertaining people of all ages since 1843. Here, old meets new very deliberately, just like everywhere else in the city – there's a roller coaster from 1914 alongside the scream-inducing Vertigo that flips people upside down at 60mph (96.6km/h). Unlike other amusement parks, Tivoli also has a cultural side with ballet performances and concerts, ranging from pop to classical music.
Slide 17 of 31: Barcelona is blessed with sunshine, even in fall, iconic sights, world-class restaurants and tiny neighborhood tapas joints, not to mention what’s considered the best urban beach in Europe. The capital of Catalunya dances to its own beat and its one-of-a-kind architecture only adds to the overall charm of this incredible city. Check out the most wonderful views on Earth here.
Slide 18 of 31: The city consists of several distinctive areas and some of the most famous include Barri Gòtic, or the Gothic Quarter, Montjuïc and Eixample, which is where some of the most inspired works of Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí are located. From Casa Batlló and Casa Milà to Sagrada Família (pictured) – Gaudí's most famous work – the city and the architect are closely linked and it's impossible to miss any of his unique buildings.
Slide 19 of 31: Another notable work by Gaudí is the Park Güell. Originally intended as a private garden for the wealthy living in the area, it's been a public part since 1926. Not only does it offer breathtaking views over the city itself but is almost an open-air art gallery in itself. A permanent feature throughout the park is Gaudí's exquisite multicolored mosaic work, most prominent on the main terrace (pictured), where a long bench in the form of a sea serpent frames the stunning views.
Slide 20 of 31: Venice’s charms are no secret. But with its arches and alleyways, fast-descending fall mists and scattering of less-visited and even abandoned islands, the city can still summon a sense of mystery. Romantics and history buffs alike will love Venice's waterways and spectacular piazzas – none more famous than the Piazza San Marco, home to St. Mark’s Basilica and Doge's Palace (pictured). 
Slide 21 of 31: Another symbol of Venice is the 16th-century Rialto Bridge (pictured) – or Ponte di Rialto – that crosses over the narrowest point of Venice’s Grand Canal and is held up as a great feat of Renaissance-era architecture. An elegant arch complete with stone reliefs, the bridge has been damaged and rebuilt several times, but is still the oldest of the four bridges crossing the Grand Canal.
Slide 22 of 31: Dominating the Venice skyline, Basilica di Santa Maria della Salute (pictured) is impossible to miss. This grand basilica from the 17th century sits right by the Grand Canal and can be spotted from many spots around Venice, most prominently the Piazza San Marco and the Ponte dell'Accademia. Built as an offering to the Madonna in return for sparing Venetians during the Black Death, its glistening white stone exterior looks simply magical. See more of the most magical places on Earth here.
Slide 23 of 31: Easy to navigate, Prague is simply a delight and no locations is more charming than the Gothic Charles Bridge (pictured). Finished in the 15th century, it's often regarded among Europe's most beautiful bridges. It connects two parts of the city – the Old Town and Lesser Town (Mala Strana). In Lesser Town, a funicular railway ascends to the summit of Petrin Hill, where the Petrin Lookout Tower bears a strong resemblance to Paris' Eiffel Tower. Other top attractions include the Old Town Square and the Prague Castle, said to be the largest castle complex in the world. See stunning images of the world's abandoned castles here.
Slide 24 of 31: It's impossible to talk about Prague without mentioning its intriguing astronomical clock (pictured). Chiming since 1410, it now sounds every hour, its four figurines – symbolizing death, vanity, greed and a Turk – nodding their heads as a series of saints poke their faces through small peepholes above. It's the second-oldest astronomical clock in the world and the oldest clock in the world that's still operating.
Slide 25 of 31: The Czech capital boasts many cherished sights, but it’s the city’s world-famous beer that is most beloved. Declared the best in the world by many, top names such as Urquell and Budvar are now joined by a flurry of exciting regional beers and new microbreweries.
Slide 26 of 31: Any exploration of Greece’s astounding history has to start in Athens – the cradle of modern democracy. The Greek capital was also the birthplace of theater and is still home to the remains of some of the earliest theaters. The Herodion Theatre was constructed by Greek nobleman Herodes Atticus on the slopes of the Acropolis in AD 161. But the Theatre of Dionysus is even more ancient – in fact, it’s the world's first theater.
Slide 27 of 31: Nothing screams Athens like the Acropolis, the rocky hill that's loomed over the city since the 5th century BC, home to some of antique period's greatest buildings, including the iconic Parthenon. The Doric temple was one of the first monuments built here when it was constructed between 447 and 438 BC. It was dedicated to Athena Parthenos, the patron of the city. Today, the sculptures of the Acropolis are housed in the gleaming, state-of-the-art Acropolis Museum, to protect and preserve them.
Slide 28 of 31: Another one of Athens' historic sites is the Agora, the ancient meetings place where Athenians' commercial, political and social activity took place. And while you might assume that Athens is just a bunch of historical ruins, you're very wrong. It’s also a city of ritzy restaurants, boozy bars and cutting-edge clubs open until dawn as well as charming, flower-clad side streets and a coastline dotted with sandy beaches within driving distance.
Slide 29 of 31: Stuffed full of iconic and historic sites, including the Trevi Fountain, Colosseum and Pantheon among many more, Rome doesn't really need an introduction. Founded in 753 BC, The Eternal City, as it's also known, has been at the heart of European history for 28 centuries and visiting Rome is like walking through a history book with different eras, from the Roman Empire to Italian Renaissance, reflected in the surrounding buildings, monuments and landmarks.
Slide 30 of 31: While you might think that Rome is just full of ruins, the wondrous construction that is the Pantheon (pictured) has been standing intact since AD 128. It's hard not to marvel at the coffered dome and its oculus that lets the light (and rain) in. The final resting place of two Italian kings, Vittorio Emanuele II and Umberto I, it's a former Roman temple that was later transformed into a Catholic church that it is today. Even though it was built almost 2,000 years ago, its dome still remains the world's largest unreinforced concrete dome.
Slide 31 of 31: Another significant destination within Rome is the Vatican (pictured). The world's smallest sovereign city state, Vatican City is the home of the Pope and acts as the headquarters of the Roman Catholic Church. It also houses several significant historic and religious monuments and artworks within its walls, including the magnificent St Peter's Basilica, the Sistine Chapel and the Vatican Museums. The world's richest treasure trove of art, the museums hold a total of nine miles (14.5km) of Italy's most celebrated artworks, including paintings, sculptures and frescoes.  Now take a look at the stunning images of Europe's most adorable small towns and villages

A virtual European vacation

Paris, France

Nicknamed both the City of Love and Light, it’s not hard to see why Paris is so enthralling. Packed chock-full of world-class museums, from the Louvre to the Musée d’Orsay, high-end boutiques, exquisite restaurants and everything else in between, it’s rightfully regarded as one of Europe’s most significant cultural, culinary and fashion capitals. Take a virtual tour around these French museums and more right now.

Paris, France

The French capital might be famous for sites like the Eiffel Tower and the Arc de Triomphe, but there’s a lot more to the city and its distinctive arrondissements (administrative districts). From the ancient, narrow lanes of Marais to the charm of Montmartre’s cobbled streets (pictured), Paris has many faces to it that are equally striking in every season.

Paris, France

Berlin, Germany

Bustling Berlin is pretty cutting edge compared with a lot of other capital cities, thanks to its booming start-up culture and young artists and innovators everywhere you look. The energy is palpable – but of course renewal and reinvention have been born of necessity here. The city’s multilayered history is reflected in such landmarks as the East Side Gallery (the remains of the Berlin Wall) as well as Checkpoint Charlie (a historic crossing point between East and West Germany) and the Holocaust Memorial. 

Berlin, Germany

The German capital’s cultural side is best on display on the charming Museum Island (pictured). Referring to the north side of the island, it’s a complex of five significant museums (a sixth, the Humboldt Forum, is due to open near the site later this year), including The Altes (Old) and The Neues (New) Museums, Old National Gallery, the Bode Museum and The Pergamon Museum, which contains several restored and significant buildings, like the Ishtar Gate of Babylon.

Berlin, Germany

London, England, UK

With 32 boroughs in the city, each with its own distinctive look and feel, London truly has something for everyone. London’s South Bank offers scenic views of the River Thames and the city itself, City is where a mix of historic buildings, like the Bank of England, exist in harmony with towering skyscrapers and Greenwich’s historic streets and regal university buildings feel like stepping through a time machine into the past.

London, England, UK

London, England, UK

For such a sprawling and populated city, London boasts plenty of green spaces too. From the vast expanse of Richmond Park to the glorious views of Hampstead Heath, central London also has its fair share of gorgeous parks and gardens. St James’s Park (pictured) and Green Park, hugging Buckingham Palace from both sides, are home to an impressive amount of wildlife, including London’s famous squirrels. Regent’s Park has beautifully manicured lawns and a magical rose garden while Hyde Park, largest of the Royal Parks, is a London landmark. Now see 30 of Britain’s most historic towns and cities.

Budapest, Hungary

Bisected by the River Danube, Hungary’s picturesque capital is actually two cities. Consisting of Buda and Pest – separated by the 19th-century Chain Bridge (Széchenyi Bridge) – the city is famed for its many thermal baths, gorgeous architecture, splendid vistas over the Danube and, of course, the one-of-a-kind Hungarian Parliament Building.

Budapest, Hungary

One of Budapest’s biggest draws is the thermal baths, with many of them more than a century old and almost all exquisitely renovated. Among the most famous are the Gellért Thermal Bath, renowned for its ornate Art Deco interior, and Széchenyi Thermal Bath (pictured) – Europe’s largest medicinal bath. The water here is supplied by two thermal springs with the water hovering around the 167ºF (75ºC) mark. The water here is said to be rich in calcium, magnesium and significant amount of fluoride, all said to contribute to better health.

Budapest, Hungary

Copenhagen, Denmark

Copenhagen, Denmark

Copenhagen, Denmark

Among Copenhagen’s most exciting draws is Tivoli Gardens (pictured). This elaborate amusement park in Copenhagen has been entertaining people of all ages since 1843. Here, old meets new very deliberately, just like everywhere else in the city – there’s a roller coaster from 1914 alongside the scream-inducing Vertigo that flips people upside down at 60mph (96.6km/h). Unlike other amusement parks, Tivoli also has a cultural side with ballet performances and concerts, ranging from pop to classical music.

Barcelona, Spain

Barcelona is blessed with sunshine, even in fall, iconic sights, world-class restaurants and tiny neighborhood tapas joints, not to mention what’s considered the best urban beach in Europe. The capital of Catalunya dances to its own beat and its one-of-a-kind architecture only adds to the overall charm of this incredible city. Check out the most wonderful views on Earth here.

Barcelona, Spain

The city consists of several distinctive areas and some of the most famous include Barri Gòtic, or the Gothic Quarter, Montjuïc and Eixample, which is where some of the most inspired works of Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí are located. From Casa Batlló and Casa Milà to Sagrada Família (pictured) – Gaudí’s most famous work – the city and the architect are closely linked and it’s impossible to miss any of his unique buildings.

Barcelona, Spain

Venice, Italy

Venice’s charms are no secret. But with its arches and alleyways, fast-descending fall mists and scattering of less-visited and even abandoned islands, the city can still summon a sense of mystery. Romantics and history buffs alike will love Venice’s waterways and spectacular piazzas – none more famous than the Piazza San Marco, home to St. Mark’s Basilica and Doge’s Palace (pictured). 

Venice, Italy

Venice, Italy

Dominating the Venice skyline, Basilica di Santa Maria della Salute (pictured) is impossible to miss. This grand basilica from the 17th century sits right by the Grand Canal and can be spotted from many spots around Venice, most prominently the Piazza San Marco and the Ponte dell’Accademia. Built as an offering to the Madonna in return for sparing Venetians during the Black Death, its glistening white stone exterior looks simply magical. See more of the most magical places on Earth here.

Prague, Czech Republic

Easy to navigate, Prague is simply a delight and no locations is more charming than the Gothic Charles Bridge (pictured). Finished in the 15th century, it’s often regarded among Europe’s most beautiful bridges. It connects two parts of the city – the Old Town and Lesser Town (Mala Strana). In Lesser Town, a funicular railway ascends to the summit of Petrin Hill, where the Petrin Lookout Tower bears a strong resemblance to Paris’ Eiffel Tower. Other top attractions include the Old Town Square and the Prague Castle, said to be the largest castle complex in the world. See stunning images of the world’s abandoned castles here.

Prague, Czech Republic

Prague, Czech Republic

The Czech capital boasts many cherished sights, but it’s the city’s world-famous beer that is most beloved. Declared the best in the world by many, top names such as Urquell and Budvar are now joined by a flurry of exciting regional beers and new microbreweries.

Athens, Greece

Any exploration of Greece’s astounding history has to start in Athens – the cradle of modern democracy. The Greek capital was also the birthplace of theater and is still home to the remains of some of the earliest theaters. The Herodion Theatre was constructed by Greek nobleman Herodes Atticus on the slopes of the Acropolis in AD 161. But the Theatre of Dionysus is even more ancient – in fact, it’s the world’s first theater.

Athens, Greece

Athens, Greece

Rome, Italy

Stuffed full of iconic and historic sites, including the Trevi Fountain, Colosseum and Pantheon among many more, Rome doesn’t really need an introduction. Founded in 753 BC, The Eternal City, as it’s also known, has been at the heart of European history for 28 centuries and visiting Rome is like walking through a history book with different eras, from the Roman Empire to Italian Renaissance, reflected in the surrounding buildings, monuments and landmarks.

Rome, Italy

While you might think that Rome is just full of ruins, the wondrous construction that is the Pantheon (pictured) has been standing intact since AD 128. It’s hard not to marvel at the coffered dome and its oculus that lets the light (and rain) in. The final resting place of two Italian kings, Vittorio Emanuele II and Umberto I, it’s a former Roman temple that was later transformed into a Catholic church that it is today. Even though it was built almost 2,000 years ago, its dome still remains the world’s largest unreinforced concrete dome.

Rome, Italy

Another significant destination within Rome is the Vatican (pictured). The world’s smallest sovereign city state, Vatican City is the home of the Pope and acts as the headquarters of the Roman Catholic Church. It also houses several significant historic and religious monuments and artworks within its walls, including the magnificent St Peter’s Basilica, the Sistine Chapel and the Vatican Museums. The world’s richest treasure trove of art, the museums hold a total of nine miles (14.5km) of Italy’s most celebrated artworks, including paintings, sculptures and frescoes. 

Now take a look at the stunning images of Europe’s most adorable small towns and villages

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